NEW: Good Company Podcast #1: Genevieve Gorder!

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Hi everyone! I am thrilled to be back with a new project I’m so excited to share: a brand new podcast! For two years (and 100 episodes), I hosted my own radio show called After the Jump. Those interviews were what inspired me to change the way we write here at Design*Sponge, and ultimately led to our most recent book project, In the Company of Women.

After a two-year podcasting break, I’m excited to be back on air and debuting the very first episode of our new podcast, Good Company, which is an extension of our new print magazine of the same name. Each week (my goal is to work up to an episode a week this fall) I’ll be talking to some of the most inspiring and innovative people in the creative community. Just like Good Company the magazine, the Good Company podcast will focus on the intersection of creativity and business. Each episode of Good Company will focus on honest, open conversations about the ups and downs of creative life. Our goal is to provide a huge dose of motivation, inspiration, practical advice, and a vital sense of connection and community for creatives at every stage of life.

For our first episode I’m starting with the person who inspired ME to work in design: designer and television host, Genevieve Gorder. We talk about how she stays inspired after 17+ years in design, how she stays afloat in a tough design economy, what she feels is missing from the design community today, her new Netflix show, and why she feels you should never be too big or too famous to go back to the work that got you where you are today.

Want to listen? Check out the very first episode on iTunes, Stitcher, Simplecast or Google Play (links below):

LISTEN on iTunes
LISTEN on Stitcher
LISTEN on Simplecast

*Thank you for listening! If you like the show, please consider rating and leaving a review on iTunes — it’s the most helpful thing listeners can do to support shows and help us get support on podcast platforms. To download a transcript version of the show, click here!

Photographs by Sasha Israel for In the Company of Women

Highlights from this episode:

“I could probably design the first house on the moon, but I’d still get asked about Trading Spaces when I got there.” (3:00)

“I don’t come from money, and so I’m always the people’s advocate for design. I know how to do a palace with my eyes closed, I’d prefer to do someone who just got their first house. Because it’s magic.” (5:00)

“Soon you’re paparazzi-ed and you’re getting carried around in empty trashcans with tarps over them because there’s 5,000 people outside the house waiting to see you when you go to shoot your job. Which is bizarre. There’s nobody who could prepare you for that. Martha couldn’t prepare you for that. Bob Villa didn’t know. It was a new movement and we could only relate to each other” (5:40)

“How do we look at ordinary things in an extraordinary way?” (11:30)

“Design is deserved by everybody and all you need is creativity. That is the commodity. If you’re creative and clever, you can turn anything into beautiful with just a little bit.” (11:40)

“We will always go back to the handmade. I know how to buy fancy things, but what if I want to change it up a bit? What if I want to make it? And what if it’s better? We only think it’s better when it costs more. And that’s a total fallacy.  (13:00)

“I feel like we look at home design as forever. We never design with the intent that maybe a part of this is temporary and this is me right now. And, like fashion, we change and our tastes change and what we want out of a house changes too. I don’t know why we don’t give our house permission to be cool and take a risk. Why not experiment? There’s no loss in that. It’s the laboratory of your life. I don’t think there’s ever a time in your life when you shouldn’t be bold and fun.” (13:40)

“I think [we should be] opening up design to a much more diverse group of human beings. My complaint since I got into this, is that I don’t see everyone’s face at the table regularly and I don’t like it.” (20:24)

“The voice [of design] right now is so white and so privileged. I would love to break up the monotony. Because it’s tired and it’s not what our country looks like — so why should all of our homes look like that?” (21:00)

Read more: feedproxy.google.com

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